Clark, David

David Clark
UK videomaker


biography

Interview: 10 questions

1. Tell me something about your life and the educational background
1A. I spent a lot of my childhood travelling. I studied art at college then went on to get a degree in graphics.

2. When, how and why started you filming?
2A.While I was studying graphic I started making videos and used the university classes to learn how to edit. I haven’t looked back.

3. What kind of subjects have your films?
3A. My films range from fun, fictional ideas to documentaries. I love capturing life in unusual ways

4. How do you develop your films, do you follow certain principles, styles etc?
4A All my films are recorded on digital camera. For me the style depends completely on the kind of film being made.

5. Tell me something about the technical equipment you use.
5A Most of my work is stop-motion so I use a Fugifilm digital camera. I have a family of tripods and put it all together on Final Cut.

6. What are the chances of the digital video technologies for creating art using “moving images” generally, and for you personally?
6A For me the digital revolution has only been of benefit. I can use previously unavailable equipment and editing software and its ongoing potential is limitless.

7. How do you finance your films?
7A Till now all of my work has been self-funded

8. Do you work individually as a video artist/film maker or do you work in a team?
if you have experience in both, what is the difference, what do you prefer?

8A I have used both ways and even the films I make solely are then shown to friends for advice etc.
Working with others can either double your efficiency or bog you down with distractions. My best advice is find people who are dependable and work well and then keep them for future projects.

9. Who or what has a lasting influence on your film/video making?
9A Tony Mines, Lee Hardcastle, Keshen 8

10. What are your future plans or dreams as a film/video maker?
10A I have an animation I’m currently working on but I also have ambitions to progress into real-film.